This form does not yet contain any fields.

    Client Testimonials

    "You saved our travertine floor! The installation was so poor, we thought we would have to tear it out. Your ability to grind, regrout, and polish the floor surpassed our expectation. Now it looks like it should have looked after being installed – the sheen is even and reflects the wonderful richness of the stone. It's gorgeous!"

    S.B.
    - Parker

    Blog Index
    The journal that this archive was targeting has been deleted. Please update your configuration.
    Navigation

    Ask The Expert

     

    Have a question? Click here to ask the expert!

    Friday
    Jan132012

    WHAT DOES IT MEAN IF MY STONE HAS RESIN COATING?

    Q: “We're shopping for natural stone countertops for our new kitchen and keep hearing about “resin coated” granite. Can you explain why it’s put into the stone?”  Phil in Littleton

    A: Hello Phil. Sure, I can explain resin. Granite, being an igneous stone formed in the earth by heat and pressure, has natural fissures. Many types of granite had to be discarded due to these fissures being present.  In the 1990’s, the Italians came up with a resin to coat the stone and fill these minute fissions.   As long as the resin performs well, there is no down side to its usage. The granite comes out of the factory with a gloss polished surface. But not all resins are created equal and some of them will fail. That is why it is mandatory for the consumer on the retail level to ask a lot of questions regarding the stone’s origins and whether or not the seller actually knows the origin of the stone. Not just country but factory as well. 

    Friday
    Jan132012

    WHAT TYPE OF CLEANING PRODUCTS DO YOU RECOMMEND?

    Q: “I usually clean my countertops with whatever all-purpose cleaner I find at the supermarket. How are those products different from the ones you use?“ Richard in Golden.

    A: Hello Richard. Frequently, all-purpose cleaners have a cleaner plus either a polishing agent or a sealant. What happens then is that a build-up begins on the stone’s surface. After a short period, the stone will feel greasy, leave fingerprints, and sometimes will look foggy.  In our company we use products from Stone Care Central or M.B. Stone Care.  Both of those companies have cleaners that are made specifically for stone.  There’s a lack of knowledge by consumers about natural stone, so we educate them so as to eliminate these types of problems in the future.

    Friday
    Jan132012

    HOW DO I PREVENT FINGERPRINTS ON MY COUNTERTOPS?

    Q: "I’m so frustrated!! No matter how often I clean my counterops, within a few hours I see fingerprints! What can I do?"  Hazel in Englewood.

    A: Hello Hazel. What are you using to clean them?  Often folks say “just a dishrag and a little soap and water.” So, here’s an analogy: how long does it take you to get the soap off your hands after washing them?  A while, right?  So, unless you are throwing water all over your granite counters, you are not getting all that soap off.  As a result, a little bit of the soap stays on the counter. Then, we have dust in the air and grease from the kitchen, etc., and now we go back and repeat the process again and again, and again and pretty soon you have fingerprints and greasy marks all over the granite.  That should never happen.  If you use the appropriate cleaner, the stone will always stay cold to the touch and clear of fingerprints.  And be sure to avoid using additional polishes or cleaners with sealants in them.

    Friday
    Jan132012

    WILL SEALING MY STONE STOP WATER RINGS?

    Q: “I’m spotting a few water rings on my countertops. Should I have them sealed to prevent them?  Abby in Cherry Creek

    A: Hello Abby. People often think that a sealant will stop what are commonly referred to as water rings.  Actually, these are etch marks, which are the separation of molecules in calcite based stones like marble, travertine and limestone.  The higher the gloss on these types of stone, the more visible the etch mark will be.  When it occurs, it is because some type of acidic substance, like household bathroom cleaning products, soda, coffee, tea or alcohol, has gone into the stone and separated the calcium carbonate molecules, leaving that “ring.” Naturally, when this happens, people say, “well, I sealed this, so it shouldn’t happen,” but that’s not true. A sealant only does two things: first, it protects against staining and, second, it will give you more time to react to a spill so the etch mark isn’t as prominent.  If the stone is properly sealed, a quick response to blot up the spill minimizes the etch mark and can be repaired easily. Remember, this is only for calcite-based stones. 

    Friday
    Jan132012

    HOW BIG A MESS SHOULD I EXPECT WHEN YOU COME TO RESTORE MY STONE?

    Q: “We need to have our marble floors cleaned and polished, but I’m worried about all the dust and mess the process will cause. How dirty should I expect my house to get?” Lee Ann in Denver

    A: Hello Lee Ann. Actually, not much. Before we do start the job, we demonstrate and explain to customers each step of the process. As this is usually a water-based restoration, there is minimal dust. We show them exactly how we will address dust, chemicals and water contaminant. That way, when we show up with all our equipment, they’re not panicked, thinking that we are going to ruin their home. And, afterwards, we educate them about what kind of stone is appropriate for each area of the house and what cleaning agents they should be using once the stone is restored. They should NOT be seeing us every six months.  This type of stone restoration in a residential setting is often a once every 5-6 year situation.